Wasson Memorial Veterinary Clinic

3083 Highway 175  Lakeport, California  95453      707.263.5380     Fax:  707.263.1525

Wasson Memorial Wildlife Fund


A few years ago Lake County lost its main wildlife rescue group.  Unfortunately leaving no one to take its place to care for the injured and sick wildlife that we humans share this beautiful county with.  Dr Susan Cannon decided to step in.  She applied for and was able to secure the proper licensing needed to treat and temporarily house these animals.


Wasson Memorial Veterinary Clinic and Clearlake Veterinary Clinic take in, treat and arrange transport of these animals to various wildlife rehabilitation facilities ,they in turn, house, feed, and continue necessary treatment of these animals.  When these animals have been rehabilitated (yes, some sadly are not), if possible, are returned to the area where they were originally found.  We try to ensure that the wonderful people who took the time to rescue these animals are given the opportunity to be the ones to return the animal back to its original location.


There is no one fundraising for this service, these veterinarians, their associates and staff do this all on their own.  During certain times of the year Wasson Memorial will have numerous birds and several types of mammals in the clinic for treatment, respite or even surgery.  The supplies:  food, medication, surgical supplies, all supplied by the veterinarians themselves or people who donate, not just their time, but also extra household items to make the animals more comfortable.


If you would like to make a donation to the Dosha, Lake County Animal Care & Control or Wasson Memorial Wildlife fund, please contact us at : 707.263.5380

Doshas spirit live on in the fund that was set up for her and her medical needs.  The fund is now available to eligible animals that need life saving procedures, but whose owners are unable to provide the financial means to cover the cost.

Donation Funds


Dosha Fund


Clearlake, California, April 2003, a young mixed breed dog by the name of 

Dosha was hit by a car.  A local police officer was the first to respond.  Doing

the humane thing, the officer shot Dosha in the head to put her out of her misery.  Dosha's body was then transported to and stored in a Lake County

Animal Control walk-in freezer.  Approximately 2 hours after being placed in the freezer, Dosha was discovered alive and standing in a body bag.


A fund was set up to help with Doshas medical bills.  Dosha did survive being hit by the car and being shot in the head.  Unfortunately Dosha did pass away a few years later.

After a veterinarian has examined  and stabilized a pet, Animal Control is limited by budget restrictions on what they can authorize a veterinarian to do to further assess a pets condition or go forward and treat.


As with all veterinarians who help Animal Control and their fight to keep pets safe and healthy, we face a large level of sadness and frustration when we see animals, adoptable animals, "put to sleep" due to lack of having an owner, "absent owner" or the unavailability of funds for further care.


When people in the community make a monetary donation to Animal Control for animal care, unfortunately the money goes into the counties general fund.  Chances are that Animal Control or the pet that the donation may have been intended for, never receive the benefit of the donation.


Wasson Memorial Veterinary Clinic has set up the Lake County Animal Care and Control Fund.  People can make a donation and it will go directly to its intended destination.......... the further care of an animal in need, while in the custody of Animal Control.

Lake County Animal Care & Control Fund


We at Wasson Memorial Veterinary Clinic see a lot of animal that get picked up, impounded, surrendered to or rescued by the dedicated officers and agents of Lake County Animal Care and Control.  Very few of the animals that are brought to us or other local veterinarians, are in good or acceptable health.  Some of these animals have injuries or health issues ranging from minimal (easy to treat) to severe and life threatening.  A good majority of these animals do not have an owner looking or coming to claim them, which means no one to take financial responsibility for their care.